Dr Rhonda Emonson, PhD

Children's fiction, Family Life

 

As a Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) Practitioner, Rhonda was the first in Australia to be awarded a PhD with research on the preparation of parents for FDR. Each child, each parent and each mediation has taught her valuable lessons. However, family separation is a significant event and experienced in a similar way, regardless of where we live in the world. The most valuable lesson is that there is hope. A new pathway can be negotiated and those who have been in conflict will move forward with confidence and renewed energy.

Heather Emonson, the illustrator of The Bird Family, lives on her farm in Cootamundra, breeds cattle and is an artist who works predominately with oils to depict her passion for the Australian landscape. Both in her gallery and on the kitchen table, Heather painted and tweaked each illustration to effectively capture the emotions that children experience as their parents separate.

The Bird Family Cards and book series are published in Australia.

 

 

All books by Dr Rhonda Emonson, PhD

Archie: My parents have separated: an 8 year old's perspective (The Bird Family)

Archie: My parents have separated: an 8 year old's perspective (The Bird Family)

The MoshShop Amazon

Eight-year-old Archie's parents have decided to end their relationship. Archie finds himself navigating new situations around the changes to his life and routine, the changes in the family dynamic, and the obstacles to finding support among his friends and peers at school. Archie is a child's perspective of parental separation and can be read alone, or paired with Charlotte, which takes the view of Archie's older sister.

 
Charlotte: My parents have separated: a 10 year old's perspective (The Bird Family)

Charlotte: My parents have separated: a 10 year old's perspective (The Bird Family)

The MoshShop Amazon

Ten-year-old Charlotte's parents are always fighting. When they decide to end their relationship, Charlotte finds herself navigating new situations around her siblings, the changes to her life and routine, and the changes in the family dynamic. Charlotte is a child's perspective of parental separation and can be read alone, or paired with Archie, which takes the view of Charlotte's younger brother.